Farmer-to-Farmer Volunteer Consultant

Farmer-to-Farmer Volunteer Consultant

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Host Organization:                 Feed the Future Ethiopia Farm Service Center Project

Assignment Location:             Addis Ababa

Duration of Assignment:         Up to20 working days

 

Assignment

Develop FSC Financial Management tools

 

Dates:

May 2017/June 2017 (10 working days in country plus travel days, and up to 10 working days remotely)

 

Objectives:

Design an FSC Financial Management and Operations Standard Operations Toolkit with Templates.

Program Description:

 

The Feed the Future Ethiopia Farm Service Center Project (herein after called the “Project”) is a three-year initiative implemented by CNFA in partnership with USAID. The project provides technical assistance and implementation support to the Ethiopian Agricultural Transformation Agency (ATA) in establishing 20 Farm Service Centers (FSCs) throughout the Amhara, Oromia, Southern Nations, Nationalities and Peoples’ (SNNPR), and Tigray regions of Ethiopia. The main goal of the project is to improve smallholder farmers’ access to agricultural inputs, improved agricultural technologies and good agricultural practices and improve farm productivity, food security and incomes. The Project directly addresses the USAID/Ethiopia Strategic Objective of “increased growth and resiliency in rural Ethiopia” and directly aligns with the United States Government’s (USG) Feed the Future initiative goal to “sustainably reduce poverty and hunger” and Government of Ethiopia’s (GOE) priority areas of increasing smallholder productivity through improved access to inputs and agronomic and veterinary services.

The central goal of the project is to further institutionalize the Farm Service Center (FSC) Business Model within the Ethiopian ATA’s transformation agenda, which aims to improve smallholder farmers’ production and productivity. The Project has three intervention areas, namely:

IR 1: Improved capacity of ATA to implement rural development programs;

IR 2: Increased competitiveness of EGAA agricultural input suppliers PLC; and 

IR 3: Improved Monitoring, Evaluation, and Learning capacity of ATA. 

In addition, the Project intervenes across a range of cross-cutting activities including gender integration, environmental stewardship, communications and public outreach, leveraging partnerships, and coordinating with relevant local initiatives. In the implementation process, the Project combines expertise of Farmer-to-Farmer (F2F) volunteers and local experts to supplement internal capabilities.  

Through the establishment of 20 FSCs, the Project is leveraging more than $3.12 million in new investments from participating Ethiopian entrepreneurs. The FSCs supply high quality and affordable agricultural inputs to more than 100,000 smallholder farmers, facilitating the creation of over 150 direct new jobs at FSCs and providing training in best agricultural practices and input-demand creation activities to 10,300 smallholder farmers.  

Assignment Description:

Currently ATA is in the process of finalizing the ribbon-cutting events that will launch 10 FSCs into operation. CNFA believes that FSC start-up operations influence the FSCs’ level of success. As FSCs emerge, it is critical to have Standard Operating Procedures (SOP) in place to establish strong financial management systems and processes and ensure that FSC finances adhere to locally and internationally recognized accounting and financial management standards and protocols. Additionally, SOPs can help FSC owners maintain reliable financial statements and reports. The first year of operation is a critical time for FSC staff and managers to acquire sufficient business management experience while Project support is still available. The Project will only cover salaries and some operational costs for approximately 12-15 months with the assumption that within that time frame, the FSCs will build a sufficient customer base and generate a steady cash flow to carry the business forward in subsequent years.

Major Responsibilities:

 

On the first assignment day, the Project will provide sample Standard Operating Procedures for FSC administration and operations in order to demonstrate the Project’s expectations. This assignment is about the development of a comprehensive and hands-on Standard Operating Procedures Manual for financial systems tailored specifically to FSC operations.

 

·           Assess and gather relevant information about existing FSC financial record keeping and reporting processes (questionnaires, reviews of existing FSC processes to design SOPs that can be replicable across FSCs).

·           Develop financial management Standard Operating Procedures to be used across FSCs.

o   Accounting process descriptions from source documents to financial report preparations.

o   Design accounting codes for overall FSC operations.

o   Define an internal control system including segregation of duties and dual controls.

o   Basic accounting records tools (receipts, journals, payroll, payment vouchers) and methods of recording (e.g. depreciation, purchases, sales).

o   Financial policy, recording and accounting procedures.

o   Develop templates for all accounting systems and types.

 

Desired Qualifications of Volunteer:

 MA/MSc Degree and above in a relevant field with extensive experience in financial management systems development for over 10 years.

– Practical experience in financial management and systems design;

– Excellent project planning, business management and communications skills;

– Exposure to USAID or other donor-funded programs;

– Excellent financial and organization skills and attention to detail;

– Must be citizen or permanent resident of the U.S.

 

Desired Impacts:

·    Increased number of new FSCs with vested interest in implementation of uniform financial management SOPs;

·    Increased number of new FSCs with strong financial record-keeping processes.

 

Host Profile Verification Items

·     Number of FSCs implementing uniform financial SOPs increased.

 

Assignment Itinerary:

 

Day 1:

Morning: Meet with the Project’s Chief of Party, Deputy Chief of Party, and Finance Specialist to refine the overall expected outcome of the assignment.  

Afternoon: Meet with the DCOP to get an overview of current program assignment timetable review.

 

Days 2-3: Visit Bishoftu FSC to gather information and templates how existing FSCs conduct finance-related operations.

 

Days 4-6: Visit Shashemene FSC to gather information and templates how existing FSCs conduct finance-related operations.

 

Days 7-10: Begin developing SOPs and templates, develop accompany training PPTs and deliver assignment debriefing with the field office.

 

Days 11-18: Finalize the development of SOPs and templates, develop accompany training PPTs.

 

Day 19: Share finalized copies of deliverables with the Field Office for final approval.

 

Day 20: Incorporate any additional feedback into documents, finalize deliverables and submit to Field Office.

 

Accommodations:

1. Hotel Accommodations:

·   Desalegn Hotel, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia;

·   Contact Information: +251 116 624524;

·    Desalegn Hotel will arrange airport pick-up and transport to the hotel.

 

2. Transportation Facilities:

·    Feed the Future Ethiopia Farm Service Project will provide daily pick-up to the hotel and office and hotel;

·    Provide business trips transportation and translation facilities.

  

3. Communications:

·     The project will provide a mobile phone and credit for the entire assignment period.

 

Recommended Preparation:

·     The month of May is a relatively hot season in Ethiopia.

·      It is also recommended that the Volunteer Consultant should take anti-malarial medication and receive all necessary vaccines prior to departure from home country. 

·      It is recommended to keep medicine and other important items with you in your handbag or carry on in case luggage is misplaced during transit.

 

Outreach:

CNFA requests that each volunteer completes at least eight hours of outreach after returning from an assignment.  This includes newspaper articles, presentations, any conversations you had about your project, and other modes of communication. Please keep this in mind during your project, and ensure that you are taking notes to correspond with photographs, meetings, or notable activities.  Your Washington DC coordinator will follow up with you both during a debriefing and again several months after your assignment is completed to get an update of your outreach efforts.

Contact Information:

CNFA – Ethiopia

Martha Zewdie

Administration Officer

CNFA Feed the Future Farm Service Center Project Ethiopia

+251(0)911-468452 [mobile]

mzewdie@cnfaethiopia.org

Feed the Future Farm Service Center Project Office Address

Yeshi Building, 4th Floor

Bole Road

Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

 

Azeb Teshale

Reception & Secretary

CNFA Feed the Future Farm Service Center Project

Ethiopia

+251(0)911-747359 [mobile]

ateshale@cnfaethiopia.org

  

Project Host(s) in Ethiopia

·   USAID Feed the Future Ethiopia Farm Service Center Project in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

·   For information regarding FSCs visit http://www.cfspethiopia.org/

·   For information regarding ATA visit http://www.ata.gov.et/

STTA: Business Advisor Consultant

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About Feed the Future Egypt Food Security and Agribusiness Support Project (FAS)

CNFA is currently seeking applications from qualified Business Advisor Consultants for its FAS project. FAS is based in Luxor and focuses on agricultural value chain development targeting smallholder farmers in Upper Egypt.

Business Advisor Consultant

Working under the direct supervision of the FAS Grants Manager, the STTA Business Advisor Consultant will support the FAS Grant Team by working with the private sector companies being considered for FAS project grant funding.

Deliverables

STTA Assignment Report in English that:

1) contains the Full Proposal workshop training materials

2) lists the contact information for the companies that received Full Proposal preparation technical assistance

3) lists the lessons learned vis-à-vis the grant process and how FAS could work more effectively with the private sector

4) recommends improvements to the grant process and the assistance provided to the private sector

Duration

Up to four months’ depending on the magnitude of grant activity.

Major Duties and Responsibilities

  • FAS Project orientation: 1) read the project’s Technical Application and quarterly reports; and 2) meet with the project’s Chief of Party, four Component Team Leaders, Field Operations Manager, and Grant Team to learn what they do and understand how private sector grant funding serves the project’s goals.
  •  Contribute to training material development and participate in the Full Proposal training workshop for the selected private sector applicants.
  •  Assist the private sector Full Proposal applicants to correctly and accurately complete Annex A: Grant Application Form (Sections A-I and Attachments 1-4) with the aim of maximizing the applicants’ success vis-à-vis the Evaluation Criteria for Full Proposal found on pages 26 and 27 of the private sector grant solicitation (http://bit.ly/FASCNFA4).
  • Discuss the Full Proposal submissions with the FtF Egypt FAS technical review committee as a non-voting member.
  • Draft and submit STTA Assignment Report in English that: 1) contains the Full Proposal workshop training materials; 2) lists the contact information for the companies that received Full Proposal preparation technical assistance; 3) lists the lessons learned vis-à-vis the grant process and how FAS could work more effectively with the private sector; and 4) recommends improvements to the grant process and the assistance provided to the private sector.

Qualifications and Requirements

  • Master’s degree in relevant field is required.
  • Minimum of ten years working as a Business Advisor on donor funded projects.
  • Agribusiness experience is preferred.
  • Experience with assisting private businesses in preparing grant applications.
  • Knowledge of USAID regulations governing grant-funded activities.
  • Strong communication skills.
  • Written and spoken fluency in English is required.
  • Willingness to travel and work anywhere in Egypt is required.

Download full description

Communication And Collaboration Officer

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This position is a one year post subject to be extended located at the program office in Conakry, Guinea. The position is contingent upon receiving authorization to work in Guinea. The Communication and Collaboration Officer will work closely with the COP and in-country team as well as the HQ-based project management unit (PMU).

General Program Description

The anticipated award in Guinea is a five year project and will have four components:

Agricultural Input Supply Services

Financial Inclusion

Market Facilitation

Stagiaire Agricole internship program

General Responsibilities

The Communication and Collaboration Officer will provide field-based support to the Guinea Program, focusing on communications/reporting, volunteer management, client relations, and website content management, and general backstopping. The C&C Officer will oversee the small Conakry office which will serve as a small outpost to receive international volunteers, interface with USAID, manage official project communications through website and regular reporting to USAID, oversee procurement process in the capital, and other responsibilities as assigned.

Qualifications

  • Master’s Degree in a relevant field (Business, agricultural economics, international relations) required;
  • A minimum of 2 years of experience in the international development or a relevant related field required, interest and experience in Africa desired;
  • Experience with USAID rules and regulations/compliance issues, M&E, budgeting, and general programmatic backstopping required; 
  • Demonstrated strong interpersonal skills, and clear, concise written communication skills required;
  • Fluency in English and working-level proficiency in French;
  • Excellent English writing skills required;
  • Outstanding organization skills with a high level of attention to detail;
  • Ability to maintain composure and flexibility under tight deadlines, and collaborative approach to facilitating communications between various stakeholders including HQ, the field office, USAID, and partners;
  • Demonstrated ability to prioritize effectively and manage multiple competing priorities;
  • Ability to engage with organizations and individuals from various cross-cultural contexts;
  • Ability to work independently and a self-starting work style;
  • MS Office proficiency required;
  • Authorization to work in the United States required.

This is an immediate and active recruitment with interviews of qualified candidates conducted on a rolling basis.

Please be advised that employment is contingent on your permanent and legal entitlement to work in the U.S. CNFA does not sponsor work visas.

Project Operations Manager

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Project Background

CNFA is currently seeking applications from qualified candidates for the USAID funded Feed the Future Egypt, Food-Security and Agribusiness Support (FAS) project.  This $23 million project focuses on agricultural value chain development targeting smallholder farmers in Upper Egypt.  

 

Position Summary

The Operations Manager supports the Chief of party (COP) in the overall administration and logistics of the program including management of personnel, reporting, finance, procurement, and compliance. In the absence of the COP, on a temporary basis, the Operations Manager assumes responsibilities for coordinating project management and implementation tasks. The position is based in Luxor, Egypt.

Qualifications

  • 10-15 years of experience managing USAID-funded projects of a similar size and scope is required. Specialization in administration and operations is required;
  • Egypt experience is required, with experience/knowledge of Egyptian laws and regulations. Upper Egypt experience is strongly preferred.
  • Demonstrated ability to successfully lead and manage complex development projects;
  • Experience managing horticulture value chains and private sector marketing activities strongly preferred;
  • Master’s degree in Business Administration or related field is required;
  • Fluency in written and spoken English

Volunteer: Mango Harvest Management

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Assignment

Maturity indices, harvest, handling and post-harvest management for mangoes

Dates

May 2017

Objectives

Improve farmer’s technical knowledge and practical applications for higher quality and reduced losses of mangoes in Upper Egypt

Host Background

Mangoes are one of the value chains that has great potential and impact on improving incomes of small farmers in Upper Egypt as identified by the Feed the Future Egypt Food Security and Agribusiness Support project (FAS). According to the Egyptian Ministry of Agriculture and Land Reclamation (MALR) 2014 statistics, mangoes occupies 22,874 feddans (23,743 acres) in the governorates of Beni Suef, Sohag, Assuit, Menia, Aswan, Luxor, and Qena. The Aswan governorate produces the largest amount of mangoes with 10,633 feddans (11,037 acres) of groves. Small farmers need training on harvest, handling and post-harvest in order to improve quality of their produce, which will result in an increase in smallholder farmers’ incomes. Mango groves are generally located in the Wady Elnokra, Wady Elsaaida, Nasser Alnoba, and Edfu districts in the Aswan governorate. In each of these regions, there are mango famer groups identified by the FAS agronomy team and Technical Advisor for Associations who will benefit from different project activities.

Issue Description

FAS works to increase agriculture-related incomes of smallholder farmer in Upper Egypt using a market-driven approach that facilitate sustainable, pro-poor value chain development and helps smallholders increase access to domestic and export markets. This market-driven approach is support by four interrelated components:

1.      Improved on-farm production

2.      More efficient post-harvest processes

3.      Improved marketing of agriculture crops and products

4.      Improved nutrition status, especially for women and children

 

Mangoes are one of the key fruit value chains in Upper Egypt that are targeted by FAS. There are a substantial number of groves throughout the area and there are numerous opportunities for smallholder farmers to vertically integrate themselves into the mango value chain by engaging in better production and post-harvest processes, as well as processing of mangoes for juice and freezing. However, mango trees in Egypt are subject to numerous shortcomings in orchard establishment and agriculture practices such as poor training, pruning, and irrigation that hinders the profitability of this value chain and limits the productivity of smallholders. One key example that is common are trees with 15-20 meter high canopies that reduces the crop and decreases the quality of fruits. Local farmers’ knowledge of deciding the best stage to harvest and management practices of harvest and handling are limited and management plans generally do not exist. Farmers do not have the technical knowledge to identify common post-harvest treatments as well as sorting, grading, and packing that are required for better marketing opportunities which will play an important role in increasing their incomes and provide job opportunities.

 

The host therefore has requested for a volunteer to train them in identifying common practices to improve harvest and handling of mangoes in Upper Egypt as well as the most effective treatments and measures to enhance their effects. The volunteer will visit farmer mango groves to assess the current needs and conduct trainings with farmer organizations on these topics, as well as work with the FAS technical team to put together a training regimen for future trainings for additional farmer groups. 

Deliverables

CNFA’s Training Beneficiaries Record, Mango Training Curriculum, Volunteer Value Reporting System Survey, and Trip Report. These documents must be completed no later than a week after assignment and preferably before the last day on assignment. 

Desired Outcomes

Improved technical knowledge of fruit maturity indices, harvest and handling management for both farmer associations trained and FAS technical staff

Desired Impacts

Increase in smallholder farmers’ ability to improve fruit quality and reduce losses

Accommodations

While in Aswan, volunteers stay at the Helnan Hotel. This is located on the east bank of the Nile in Aswan and located close to several food options and easy transport to the FAS office via taxi.

Outreach

CNFA requests each volunteer to complete outreach activities after returning from an assignment.  Volunteer outreach helps foster cultural understanding and spreads the word about U.S. international development efforts. Outreach activities include any conversations you have about your project, newspaper articles, presentations, social media posts, or other events.  Please keep this in mind during your project, and ensure that you are taking notes to correspond with photographs, meetings, or notable activities.  Your Washington DC coordinator will follow up with you both during debriefing and again several months after your assignment is completed to get an update of your outreach efforts.

For full assignment itinerary and project contacts, please download the full description at the bottom of this job posting.

Desired Qualifications of Volunteer

  • Experienced managing maturity indices, harvest and handling in fruit trees, especially mango
  • Extensive practical experience managing fruit trees, especially mango
  • Knowledge of common postharvest requirements for fruit trees
  • Patience and positive attitude when working with local Egyptian farmers
  • Must be citizen or permanent resident of the U.S.

Volunteer Preparation

  • The month of May is the spring season in Egypt. Volunteers are encouraged therefore to bring some clothes for warm weather. 
  • CNFA volunteer assignments require some pre-departure preparation by the volunteer, since time in country is limited. Please consult with your CNFA program officer or field staff for any information or assistance you need to properly prepare for your assignment. Needed materials can be discussed with in-country staff, via email, prior to departure.
  • The volunteer will be equipped with local cell phone for easy communication with FAS team in Egypt.
  • The volunteer will have full access to an FAS laptop computer, flip-chart stand, and other office equipment. Please inform FAS staff if training will require additional resources.
  • The use of videos, PowerPoint presentations and hands-on activities to emphasize main points are strongly recommended during your assignment.

Download full description

Composting Volunteer

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Assignment

Management of farm residuals and production of compost

Dates

April- May 2017

Objectives

Increase incomes of small farmers in Upper Egypt by producing organic fertilizer from farm residuals, improve soil fertility, water holding capacity, and irrigation efficiency 

The Feed the Future Egypt Food Security and Agribusiness Support project (FAS) works to increase agriculture-related incomes of smallholder farmer in Upper Egypt using a market-driven approach that facilitate sustainable, pro-poor value chain development and helps smallholders increase access to domestic and export markets. This market-driven approach is support by four interrelated components:

1.      Improved on-farm production

2.      More efficient post-harvest processes

3.      Improved marketing of agriculture crops and products

4.      Improved nutrition status, especially for women and children

 

Currently many Upper Egyptian farmers burn organic residuals from their horticulture production which is considered a source of environmental pollution while others leave residuals around their orchard which is considered a source of pests and disease. Compost production utilizes all farm residuals, improves the production, efficiency, and profitability of FAS small farmers for different value chains within their farmer associations as well as decreasing input costs for fertilizer. The key benefits compost production are as follows:

·         Increased agricultural productivity through:

o   Improved soil conditioning (i.e. physical and chemical characteristics)

o   Disease suppression

o   Pathogen destruction

·         Reduced waste disposal costs and water usage

·         More positive environmental impact

 

The host has therefore requested for a volunteer to train them in common practices to produce compost from farm residuals in Upper Egypt. The volunteer will visit farmer groups to assess the current needs and conduct trainings with farmer organizations on these topics, as well as work with the FAS technical team to put together a training regimen for future trainings for additional farmer groups. 

Deliverables

Horticulture Residual Composting Training Curriculum, CNFA’s Training Beneficiaries Record, Volunteer Value Reporting System Survey, and Trip Report. These documents must be completed no later than a week after assignment and preferably before the last day on assignment. 

Desired Outcomes

Improved technical knowledge of farm residuals management for both farmer associations and FAS technical staff

Desired Impacts

Increase in smallholder farmers’ income by producing organic fertilizer and improve environmental impact and disease and pest infection rates

Desired Qualifications of Volunteer

  • Experienced managing farm residuals
  • Extensive practical experience in compost production
  • Knowledge of common organic fertilizers to horticulture crops
  • Patience and positive attitude when working with local Egyptian farmers
  • Must be citizen or permanent resident of the U.S.

Download full description

Sweet Potato Post-Harvest Volunteer

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Assignment Location:

Minia and Bani Suef  

 

Assignment:

Post-Harvest (Curing) for Sweet Potatoes

Dates:

June 2017

Objectives:

Improve farmer’s technical knowledge and practical applications for post-harvest handling and technologies, specifically relate to curing, of sweet potatoes in Upper Egypt.

Host Background:

Sweet potatoes are mainly grown in the governorates of Minia and Bani Suef. The volunteer will be based out of the FAS project office located in Minia with visits to sweet potato farmers in the surrounding area. 

Issue Description:

The Feed the Future Egypt Food Security and Agribusiness Support project (FAS) works to increase agriculture-related incomes of smallholder farmer in Upper Egypt using a market-driven approach that facilitate sustaintable, pro-poor value chain development and helps smallholders increase access to domestic and export markets. This market-driven approach is support by four interrelated components:

1. Improved on-farm production

2. More efficient post-harvest processes

3. Improved marketing of agriculture crops and products

4. Improved nutrition status, especially for women and children

Sweet potatoes are one of the key vegetable value chains in Upper Egypt that are targetted by FAS. It is widely grown in the governorates of Assiut, Aswan, Beni Suef, Menia, and Sohag of Upper Egypt. Due to Upper Egypt having both an ideal climate and soil for sweet potatoes, there are many opportunities for smallholder farmers to vertically integrate themselves into the sweet potato value chain by engaging in better production and post-harvest processes, most especially curing. However, there is a lack of both technical knowledge and infrastructure available to smallholder farmers that allow them to take advantage of simple post-harvest techniques that can increase the shelf life and profitability of their produce.  

The host therefore has requested for a volunteer to train FAS staff in post-harvest techniques that can increase the profitability and quality of sweet potatoes, mostly importantly related to curing. The volunteer will visit farmer fields that grow sweet potatoes to assess the current capacity and knowledge of farmers as well as identify any existing infrastructure that can be used for sweet potato curing. Once the volunteer has assessed the operating environment, they will develop a training plan that addresses relevant post-harvest handling techniques that farmers can use to increase the quality and production of their harvests and work with the FAS technical team to put together a training regimen for future trainings for additional farmer groups. These trainings should focus on producing sweet potatoes that are export quality to markets in the EU and Arab Gulf.

Desired Outcomes and Impacts:

Desired outcomes: Improved technical knowledge of sweet potato post-harvest handling techniques and technologies for both farmer associations trained and FAS technical staff

Desired impacts: Increase in the quality and production of smallholder farmers’ sweet potato harvest through the utilization of post-harvest techniques, including curing.

Accommodations: 

While in Minia, volunteers stay at the Grand Aton hotel which is located close to several food options and easy transport to the FAS office via taxi.

Volunteer Preparation:

The month of  June is the spring season in Egypt. Volunteers are encouraged therefore to bring some clothes for warm weather.

 

CNFA volunteer assignments require some pre-departure preparation by the volunteer, since time in country is limited. Please consult with your CNFA program officer or field staff for any information or assistance you need to properly prepare for your assignment. Needed materials can be discussed with in-country staff, via email, prior to departure.

The volunteer will have full access to an FAS laptop computer, flip-chart stand, and other office equipment. Please inform FAS staff if training will require additional resources.

The use of slides, videos, overheads, PowerPoint presentations and hands-on activities to emphasize main points are strongly recommended during your assignment.

Outreach:

CNFA requests each volunteer to complete outreach activities after returning from an assignment.  Volunteer outreach helps foster cultural understanding and spreads the word about U.S. international development efforts. Outreach activities include any conversations you have about your project, newspaper articles, presentations, social media posts, or other events.  Please keep this in mind during your project, and ensure that you are taking notes to correspond with photographs, meetings, or notable activities.  Your Washington DC coordinator will follow up with you both during debriefing and again several months after your assignment is completed to get an update of your outreach efforts.

*Please download the full description for a complete itinerary and project contacts.

Desired Qualifications of Volunteer

  • Experienced managing post-harvest practices for sweet potatoes, specifically with utilizing and managing curing room technology
  • Extensive practical experience managing sweet potato farms
  • Knowledge of post-harvest techniques and technologies for sweet potatoes
  • Knowledge of private sector markets for sweet potatoes in Egypt, Arab Gulf, and Europe preferred
  • Patience and positive attitude when working with local Egyptian farmers
  • Must be citizen or permanent resident of the U.S.

Deliverables

  • A Sweet Potato Post-Harvest Needs Assessment Report
  • Sweet Potato Post-Harvest Training Curriculum
  • CNFA’s Training Beneficiaries Record, Volunteer Value Reporting System Survey, and Trip Report. These documents must be completed no later than a week after assignment and preferably before the last day on assignment. 

Download full description

Request for Quotations (RFQ): Molds for Producing Plastic Boxes for Fruits

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Request for Quotations (RFQ)

 

Description: Molds for producing plastic boxes for fruits

 

For: Agricultural Support to Azerbaijan Project (ASAP)

 

Funded By: United States Agency for International Development (USAID)

                       

Implemented By: CNFA

Section 1: Instructions to Offerors

 

Introduction: The Agricultural Support to Azerbaijan Project (ASAP) Project is a four-year USAID-funded program implemented by CNFA in Azerbaijan. The objective of ASAP is to support the diversification of the economy through initiatives that assist small and medium-sized agribusinesses and farmers to grow. The project targets the following value chains: berries, hazelnuts, orchard crops, pomegranates, and vegetables. As part of project activities, ASAP seeks to procure molds (supply and installation) for equipment that produces plastic boxes for a project beneficiary in Guba.

The purpose of this RFQ is to solicit quotations for molds (supply and installation) of the equipment producing plastic boxes for the ASAP’s beneficiary in Guba engaged in production, procurement and storage of fruits.

Offerors are responsible for ensuring that their offers are received by CNFA in accordance with the instructions, terms, and conditions described in this RFQ.  Failure to adhere to instructions described in this RFQ may lead to disqualification of an offer from consideration.

 

1.       Offer Deadline and Protocol: Offers must be received no later than 16:00 local Baku time on March 17, 2017 by email to procurement@asapaz.org. Please reference the RFQ number in any response to this RFQ. Offers received after the specified time and date will be considered late and will be evaluated only at the discretion of CNFA.

 

2.       Questions: Questions regarding the technical or administrative requirements of this RFQ may be submitted no later than 18:00 local Baku time on March 15, 2017 by email to procurement@asapaz.org.

 

Questions must be submitted in writing; phone calls will not be accepted. Questions and requests for clarification—and the responses thereto—that CNFA believes may be of interest to other offerors will be circulated to all RFQ recipients who have indicated an interest in bidding.

 

Only the written answers issued by CNFA will be considered official and carry weight in the RFQ process and subsequent evaluation. Any verbal information received from employees of CNFA or any other entity should not be considered as an official response to any questions regarding this RFQ.

 

3.       Quotations: Quotations in response to this RFQ must be priced in USD.  Offers must remain valid for not less than ninety (90) calendar days after the offer deadline. Offerors are requested to provide quotations on official letterhead or format.

 

4.       Eligibility: By submitting an offer in response to this RFQ, the offeror certifies that it and its principal officers are not debarred, suspended, or otherwise considered ineligible for an award by the U.S. Government. CNFA will not award a contract to any firm that is debarred, suspended, or considered to be ineligible by the U.S. Government.

 

5.       Source: The offeror shall confirm that no proposed items were manufactured in, sold by, or shipped from source countries that are designated as prohibited sources. As of the drafting of the present RFQ, the list of countries designated as prohibited sources included North Korea, Myanmar, Cuba, Syria, Sudan, and Iran. In addition, the offeror must adhere to appropriate governing restrictions including the source and nationality requirements set forth in 22 CFR 228 and the standard provisions. The authorized geographic code for procurements of goods and services conducted by the project is 937 for any procurements exceeding $25,000. Therefore, vendors registered in Azerbaijan, the United States, or developing countries, other than advanced developing countries, and goods available for purchase in those countries, are preferred for this procurement. Procurements from advanced developing countries for which ASAP would contribute over $25,000 would require a waiver from USAID. For a complete list of developing countries and advanced developing countries, see

 

https://www.usaid.gov/ads/policy/300/310maa

 

https://www.usaid.gov/ads/policy/300/310mab

 

6.       Evaluation and Award: The award will be made to a responsible offeror whose offer follows the RFQ instructions, meets the eligibility requirements, and is determined via a trade-off analysis to be the best value based on application of the following evaluation criteria. In conducting its evaluation, CNFA may seek information from any source it deems appropriate to obtain or validate information regarding the Bidder’s quotation. Both mandatory criteria and evaluation factors are indicated below. The relative importance of each individual evaluation factor is indicated by the number of points described in the “full description,” which is available for download by clicking the link at the bottom of this announcement.

 

Please note that if there are significant deficiencies regarding responsiveness to the requirements of this RFQ, an offer may be deemed “non-responsive” and thereby disqualified from consideration. CNFA reserves the right to waive immaterial deficiencies at its discretion.

 

Best-offer quotations are requested. It is anticipated that award will be made solely on the basis of these original quotations. However, CNFA reserves the right to conduct any of the following:

 

·         CNFA may conduct negotiations with and/or request clarifications from any offeror prior to award.

·         While preference will be given to offerors who can address the full technical requirements of this RFQ, CNFA may issue a partial award or split the award among various offerors, if in the best interest of the ASAP Project.

·         CNFA may cancel this RFQ at any time.

 

Please note that in submitting a response to this RFQ, the offeror understands that USAID is not a party to this solicitation and the offeror agrees that any protest hereunder must be presented—in writing with full explanations—to the ASAP Project for consideration, as USAID will not consider protests regarding procurements carried out by implementing partners. CNFA, at its sole discretion, will make a final decision on the protest for this procurement.

 

Organizations responding to this RFQ are requested to submit a copy of their official registration or business license.

7.       Terms and Conditions: This is a Request for Quotations only. Issuance of this RFQ does not in any way obligate CNFA, the ASAP Project, or USAID to make an award or pay for costs incurred by potential offerors in the preparation and submission of an offer.

 

This solicitation is subject to CNFA’s standard terms and conditions. Any resultant award will be governed by these terms and conditions. Please note that payment will only be issued to the entity submitting the offer in response to this RFQ and identified in the resulting award; payment will not be issued to a third party.

 

Financing of awards resulting from this RFQ will be through USAID.  Awards financed by USAID may be subject to prior approval requirements.

 

CNFA complies with U.S. Sanctions and Embargo laws and Regulations including Executive Order 13224 on Terrorist Financing, which effectively prohibit transactions with persons or entities that commit, threaten to commit or support terrorism. Any person or entity that participates in this bidding process, either as a prime or sub to the prime, must certify as part of the bid that he or it is not on the U.S. Department of Treasury Office of Foreign Assets Control (OFAC) Specially Designated Nationals (SDN) List and is eligible to participate. CNFA International shall disqualify any bid received from a person or entity that is found to be on the List or otherwise ineligible.

 

Section 2: Offer Checklist

 

To assist offerors in preparation of proposals, the following checklist summarizes the documentation to include an offer in response to this RFQ:

 

□ Cover letter, signed by an authorized representative of the offeror (see Section 5 for template)

 

□ Official quotation, including responses to evaluation criteria (Section 3).

 

□ Copy of offeror’s registration or business license (see Section 1.5 for more details).

 

 

***** ETHICAL AND BUSINESS CONDUCT REQUIREMENTS *****

 

 

CNFA does not tolerate fraud, collusion among offerors, falsified proposals/bids, bribery, or kickbacks. Any firm or individual violating these standards will be disqualified from this procurement, barred from future procurement opportunities, and may be reported to both USAID and the Office of the Inspector General.

 

Employees and agents of CNFA are strictly prohibited from asking for or accepting any money, fee, commission, credit, gift, gratuity, object of value or compensation from current or potential vendors or suppliers in exchange for or as a reward for business. Employees and agents engaging in this conduct are subject to termination and will be reported to USAID and the Office of the Inspector General. In addition, CNFA will inform USAID and the Office of the Inspector General of any supplier offers of money, fee, commission, credit, gift, gratuity, object of value or compensation to obtain business.

 

Offerors responding to this RFQ must include the following as part of the proposal submission:

•           Disclose any close, familial, or financial relationships with CNFA or project staff. For example, if an offeror’s cousin is employed by the project, the offeror must state this.

•           Disclose any family or financial relationship with other offerors submitting proposals. For example, if the offeror’s father owns a company that is submitting another proposal, the offeror must state this.

•           Certify that the prices in the offer have been arrived at independently, without any consultation, communication, or agreement with any other offeror or competitor for the purpose of restricting competition.

•           Certify that all information in the proposal and all supporting documentation are authentic and accurate.

•           Certify understanding and agreement to CNFA’s prohibitions against fraud, bribery and kickbacks.

 

Please contact Alan Pieper, Executive Vice President for Operations and Compliance at apieper@cnfa.org with any questions or concerns regarding the above information or to report any potential violations.

Section 3: Official Quotation (Items/Description/Technical Specifications)

The subject of the procurement is the purchase and assembling of molds (18x40x60 and 18x30x40) for the equipment producing plastic boxes.

Most of the fruits grown in Azerbaijan are still packed in wooden boxes. However, the demand for such packaging is decreasing every year. In particular, fruits and vegetables should be packed in plastic boxes to be exported and sold in the supermarkets.  At the same time, plastic boxes are lighter than wooden boxes.  In terms of weight, the plastic boxes are more profitable during transportation and shipping. For instance, in comparison with wooden boxes, the tara weight of products shipped in plastic boxes in 20 tons of container makes a difference of 2,5-3 tons.  The weight of plastic box is lighter than wooden. The plastic boxes are also more hygienic and recyclable, even useless swinging plastic boxes are purchased by the box producers as raw materials to re-produce. One of the advantages is that it has no negative impact on the environment.  But adverse environmental impacts are followed in the production of wooden boxes. So the trees are used as raw materials in the manufacturing of wooden boxes caused cutting of trees, deforestation. In addition, more labor force is required for the processing of trees, a lot of scrap, turnings are collected and sometimes these remaining parts are kept unused and spread over the environment.

So, interested bidders are required to indicate all necessary parts’ details of mold assembling and exploitation (18x40x60 cm and 18x30x40 cm) for the production of plastic boxes. The proposed materials, quantity, unit price should be described in the table below. The bidder should indicate the staff (employee) capable assembling the equipment, also providing training on operation of the equipment to the client at least 2 days .

 

Quotation Submission Date

Submit Quotation to

Terms of Payment

On or before 16:00 on

March 17, 2017

Please submit your Quotation at or before the indicated deadline by email to procurement@asapaz.org

 

Bidder shall propose payment terms. Note that it is CNFA policy to limit prepayment, advance payment or mobilization payment to 25% of total price. Additionally, CNFA’s preference is payment upon delivery of goods. Bidder should factor in the cost of financing and/or obtaining a loan from a bank in the pricing of its bid.

 

 

Section 5: Offer Cover Letter

 

The following cover letter must be placed on letterhead and completed/signed/stamped by a representative authorized to sign on behalf of the offeror:

 

To:                   ASAP Project

           

Reference:        RFQ no. CNFA-AZ-53

 

To Whom It May Concern:

 

We, the undersigned, hereby provide the attached offer to perform all work required to complete the activities and requirements as described in the above-referenced RFQ. Please find our offer attached.

 

We hereby acknowledge and agree to all terms, conditions, special provisions, and instructions included in the above-referenced RFQ. We further certify that the below-named firm—as well as the firm’s principal officers and all services offered in response to this RFQ—are eligible to participate in this procurement under the terms of this solicitation and under USAID regulations.

 

Furthermore, we hereby certify that, to the best of our knowledge and belief:

·         We have no close, familial, or financial relationships with any CNFA or ASAP project staff members;

·         We have no close, familial, or financial relationships with any other offerors submitting proposals in response to the above-referenced RFQ; and

·         The prices in our offer have been arrived at independently, without any consultation, communication, or agreement with any other offeror or competitor for the purpose of restricting competition.

·         All information in our proposal and all supporting documentation is authentic and accurate.

·         We understand and agree to CNFA’ prohibitions against fraud, bribery, and kickbacks.

 

We hereby certify that the enclosed representations, certifications, and other statements are accurate, current, and complete.

 

Authorized Signature:                                                                                                                    

 

Name and Title of Signatory:                                                                                                          

 

Date:                                                                                                                                             

 

Company Name:                                                                                                                            

 

Company Address:                                                                                                                        

 

Company Telephone and Website:                                                                                                  

 

Company Registration or Taxpayer ID Number:                                                                              

 

Does the company have an active bank account (Yes/No)?                                                               

 

Official name associated with bank account (for payment):                                                               

Closing March 17.

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Request for Quotations (RFQ): Restoring Efficiency to Agriculture Production

Posted On: Filed Under:

Background:

 

USAID’s Restoring Efficiency to Agriculture Production (REAP) is a market-driven and result-oriented enterprise development project that increases incomes and employment in rural area by delivering firm-level investment and tailor-made technical assistance to agribusiness enterprises that provide inputs, services, training and cash markets to smallholder farmers. REAP catalyzes increased private sector investment and commercial finance to the sector, mitigates risks for rural SMEs and entrepreneurs, and expands commercially sustainable linkages among producer, postharvest enterprises and end markets. To ensure the long term sustainability and success of these investments, REAP delivers market driven tailored technical assistance and group trainings to agribusiness enterprises and smallholder producers.

With $183 million and $176 million in exports in 2014 and 2015 respectively, the hazelnut sector is Georgia’s highest earning agricultural export and supports the livelihoods of more than 40,000 rural families. In 2016, the value of hazelnut exports and attributable income to smallholder farmers is expected to be reduced by more than $60 million[1] due to the emergence of the Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB), whose infestation has reduced both quality and quantity of hazelnut kernels. Originating from China, the BMSB has in recent years reduced hazelnut production in the US, Europe and Turkey. Arriving in Georgia in late 2015, the rapid growth of the BMSB population, threatens not only the hazelnut sector but other key agriculture sub-sectors including grapes, corn, peaches, apples and vegetables. If not contained, the BMSB has the potential to set Georgia back years in their agriculture growth and development.

In late November, 2016, the National Food Agency (NFA) in cooperation with USAID and the provate sector company, organized an international technical committee to analyze the BMSB problem in Georgia and to advise the Ministry of Agriculture (MoA) on appropriate mitigating actions. Comprised of international entomologists, public and private sector stakeholders and international agriculture development organizations, the international technical committee provided a draft plan of action for consideration by the NFA.

The NFA formed a Working Group to develop the justification and activities for a State Program to combat the BMSB throughout 2017. While eradication is not possible, monitoring, educating and managing the BMSB in 2017 will be crucial to controlling the population’s growth, limiting agriculture losses and developing a long-term management plan. One of the important parts of the management system is establishment of the monitoring system that will inform the NFA’s strateries and activities in 2017 and beyond.

REAP is soliciting quotations from eligible and responsible firms for the Procurement of  BMSB Lures and Sticky Traps to set up the BMSB monitoring system. REAP will issue a fixed price contract for the selected vendor(s). It is anticipated that fixed price contract will be awarded no later than March 15, 2017. Preferable delivery time of all or first shipment is no later than April 20. Delivery place: Poti Port/or Batumi Port in case of sea shipment and/or Tbilisi, Georgia, in case of air shipment.

 

The procurement is for the supply of:

 

1-       BMSB Lures- up to 88,160 units

2-       Sticky Traps- up to 88,160 units

Successful offeror will be requested to cooperate with National Food Agency of the Ministry of Agriculture of Georgia (MOA) to ensure compliance with Georgian and EPA/USA regulations which guide hazardous chemical substances registration and use in Georgia. The successful offeror will be entirely responsible for ensuring compliance with the NFA regulations regarding registering the requested products prior to importing. Payments will not be made to the contractor prior to ensuring proof of registration. 

 

Please submit  the bid for the goods described in the attached pages in accordance with the instructions and terms and conditions of the RFQ as presented below.

 

This RFQ includes the following sections:

 

Offer Deadline and Protocol

Questions/Clarifications

Prohibited Sources

Eligibility of Offerors

Quotations

Terms and Conditions of the RFQ

Basis of Award

Negotiations

Place of Performance

Payment and Award

Technical Specifications

 

All correspondence and/or inquiries regarding this Request for Quotation must be in accordance with the instructions contained in this RFQ. Failure to comply with the instructions described in this RFQ may lead to disqualification of an offer from consideration.

 

1.         OFFER DEADLINE AND PROTOCOL

Offers must be received no later than 17:00 EST, March 20, 2017. Late offers will not be considered by REAP and must be sent by e-mail to the party listed below on or before the designated offer receipt date and closing time.  Please indicate RFQ-BMSB-001 on the subject line of your e-mail.

 

Ms. Manana Kakuchaia

Director of  Finance and Administration

USAID/Restoring Efficiency to Agriculture Production (REAP)

#47 Kostava St., 2 floor, room#22

 0179, Tbilisi, Georgia

procurement@georgiareap.org

Tel: +995 322 982207/13/14/18

Please also submit your offer by applying to this ad.

 

 

2.         QUESTIONS/CLARIFICATIONS

All questions and/or clarifications regarding this RFQ must be in writing and can be submitted to procurement@georgiareap.org. Questions and requests for clarification must be received by email no later than 17:00 EST, March 10, 2017. Questions and requests for clarification—and the responses thereto—that CNFA believes may be of interest to other offerors will be circulated to all RFQ recipients who have indicated an interest in bidding.

 

Only the written answers issued by REAP will be considered official and carry weight in the RFQ process and subsequent evaluation. Any verbal information received from employees of CNFA or any other entity should not be considered as an official response to any questions regarding this RFQ.

 

3.         PROHIBITED SOURCES

The following applies to this RFQ, all related correspondence, and any resulting subcontract:

 

No items, items with components from, that are manufactured or assembled in, shipped from, transported through, or otherwise involving any of the following countries may be offered: Burma (Myanmar), Cuba, Iran, North Korea, (North) Sudan and Syria. Related services include incidental services pertaining to any/all aspects of this work to be performed under a resulting subcontract (including transportation, fuel, lodging, meals, and communications expenses).

Offerers are asked to provide a Certificate of Origin for all goods.

 

4.         Eligibility of Offerors

In accordance with Federal Acquisition Regulation Clause 52.209-6, “Protecting the Government’s Interest When Subcontracting with Contractors Debarred, Suspended, or Proposed for Debarment,” (SEP 2006), all offerors must certify that they are not debarred, suspended, or proposed for debarment by the USG.  REAP will not award a subcontract to any firm or firms’ principals who are debarred, suspended, or proposed for debarment, or who proposes to do business with firms (including subcontractors) or firms’ principals who are debarred, suspended, or proposed for debarment, in the performance of the requirement of this activity.

 

5.         QUOTATIONS

 

Quotations should be written in English. In addition to quotations, offerors should submit a cover letter (Attachment 1), a technical offer which should include the following information:

 

–          Bidder’s full legal name, contact information and the name of the authorized representative;

–          List of similar services performed during the last few years (contact information of at least three clients to be provided for the reference check)

–          The duration of the validity of the quotation. The duration of validity of the quotation should be no less than 65 working days.

Price quotations should be expressed in US Dollars (USD) and all-inclusive of any associated costs, including cost per unit. Offerors are requested to provide quotations containing the information in Attachment 2, on official letterhead or official quotation format separately for each sub section. In the event that this is not possible, offerors may complete the table in Attachment 2 below by choosing the subsection of their interest, and submit a signed/stamped version to CNFA.

Offeror should also include a Certificate of Origin for products, as well as detailed information about the product, including a safety data sheet.

 

6.         TERMS AND CONDITIONS OF THE RFQ

Issuance of this solicitation does not in any way obligate REAP to award a subcontract, nor does it commit REAP to pay for costs incurred in the preparation and submission of the offer. REAP reserves the right to make revisions to the content and order of the provisions in the actual purchase document prior to execution by REAP and the selected awardee. 

 

Please note this solicitation is subject to the following terms and conditions:

a)       CNFA’s standard payment terms are net 30 days after receipt and acceptance of any commodities or deliverables. Payment will only be issued to the entity submitting the offer in response to this RFQ and identified in the resulting award; payment will not be issued to a third party.

b)      Any award resulting from this RFQ will be firm fixed price, in the form of a contract or purchase order.

c)       No commodities or services may be supplied that are manufactured or assembled in, shipped from, transported through, or otherwise involving any of the following countries: Burma (Myanmar), Cuba, Iran, North Korea, (North) Sudan, Syria.

d)      Any international air or ocean transportation or shipping carried out under any award resulting from this RFQ must take place on U.S.-flag carriers/vessels.

e)       United States law prohibits transactions with, and the provision of resources and support to, individuals and organizations associated with terrorism. The supplier under any award resulting from this RFQ must ensure compliance with these laws.

f)       The title to any goods supplied under any award resulting from this RFQ shall pass to CNFA following delivery and acceptance of the goods by CNFA. Risk of loss, injury, or destruction of the goods shall be borne by the offeror until title passes to CNFA.

 

7.         BASIS FOR AWARD

The award will be made to a responsible offeror whose offer follows the RFQ instructions, meets the eligibility requirements, and is determined via a trade-off analysis to be the best value based on application of the criteria below. A Review Panel, appointed by the REAP project, will evaluate quotations submitted by eligible firms in accordance with the following:

 

Technical capability (40%) – Based on ability of offeror to provide goods with requested specifications, experience and reputation of an offeror

Cost (30%) — Ability to provide a reasonable and competitive cost offer

Terms of Delivery(30%) – Delivery terms are DDP (INCOTERMS 2010) to the locations indicated above: Poti Port/or Batumi Port in case of sea shipment and/or Tbilisi, Georgia in case of air shipment.

 

Please note that if there are significant deficiencies regarding responsiveness to the requirements of this RFQ, the offer may be deemed “non-responsive” and thereby disqualified from consideration.

 

8.         NEGOTIATIONS

Best offer quotations are requested.  It is anticipated that awards will be made solely on the basis of these original quotations.  However, REAP reserves the right to conduct negotiations and/or request clarifications prior to award.

 

9.       PLACE OF PERFORMANCE

Delivery terms are DDP (INCOTERMS 2010), place of performance at the following location: Tbilisi, Georgia in case of air shipment and Poti Port/Batumi Port, Georgia in case of sea shipment (delivery terms can be negotiated with the selected vendor). Each offerer is expected to provide an estimate (in calendar days) of the delivery timeframe (after receipt of order). The delivery estimate presented in an offer in response to this RFQ must be upheld in the performance of any resulting subcontract.

 

Due to urgency, REAP encourages offerors to submit financial offers which provide the cost of air shipment (at least for the 1st shipment) as well as sea shipment, calculated based on the unit of shipment such as 20 feet container. Air shipment delivery location is Tblisi, Georgia.

 

10.    PAYMENT AND AWARD

The contract will be awarded to the offeror whose quotation represents the best value to REAP. The payment will be made through a contract between REAP and the offeror.

 

Bidders are responsible for ensuring that their offers are received in accordance with the instructions stated herein.  Failure to adhere to the instructions described herein may lead to a quotation’s disqualification from consideration.

 

The negotiated purchase order/contract is subject to REAP’s terms and conditions.

 

Please note that in submitting a quotation, the bidder understands that USAID is not a party to this RFQ. Therefore the bidder agrees that any protest hereunder must be presented — in writing with full explanations — to REAP for consideration. USAID will not consider protests made to it under USAID-financed subcontracts.  CNFA, the implementer of REAP, at its sole discretion, will reach the final decision on the protest for this procurement.

 

11. TECHNICAL SPECIFICATIONS

1.      BMSB Monitoring Lures

BMSB monitoring lure  should consist of two components: BMSB specific attractant, BMSB aggregation pheromone and a synergist (MDT or similar), which increases the potency of the BMSB. Technical offers should provide the ratios of these two components.

 

 

2.      BMSB Sticky traps

The clear plastic sticky traps should be covered with “Hot Glue” on two sides, which will trap insects but the glue will not stick to hands.  The dimensions of traps could be typically square (25cm x 25cm),  or rectangle (15cm x 25cm). However, other applicable dimensions may be also considered.

 

Shipment and delivery time

 

1      BMSB Lures (up to 88,160 units)

This amount of lures can be delivered in one shipment (air or sea) or divided in two subsequent shipments:

1    Shipment 1-  22,040 units are necessary to be in Georgia by April 20, 2017.

2    Shipment 2- 66,120 units are necessary to be in Georgia by the end of May 2017.

 

 

2       Sticky Traps (up to 88,160 units)

This amount of traps can be delivered in one shipment (air or sea) or divided in two subsequent shipments:

1   Shipment 1- 22,040 units are necessary to be in Georgia by April 20, 2017.

2   Shipment 2- 66,120 units are necessary to be in Georgia by the end of May 2017.

[1] Initial economic analysis of BMSB provided by USAID and Ferrero’s Georgia Hazelnut Improvement Project (G-HIP)

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